New MacBook Pro Retina

Our new MacBook Pro Retina arrived while we were in Hawaii.

Our old MacBook Pro was getting long in the tooth. It was a pre-unibody, 2007 model, 2.4 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo with 4 GB of RAM, a 500 GB spinning disk drive, and OS X 10.6.8 (Snow Leopard).

The new one has a Retina display, 2.8 GHz processor, 16 GB RAM and a 1 TB SSD and it’s running OS X 10.9.4 (Mavericks).

It’s been challenging to migrate files from the old laptop to the new one, as the old one keeps crashing.

Pull request to allow supervisor to send arbitrary signals to processes

https://github.com/Supervisor/supervisor/pull/477

Let’s you do stuff like:

$ supervisorctl
cat:0                            RUNNING   pid 57305, uptime 0:00:07
cat:1                            RUNNING   pid 57304, uptime 0:00:07
cat:2                            RUNNING   pid 57307, uptime 0:00:07
cat:3                            RUNNING   pid 57306, uptime 0:00:07
cat:4                            RUNNING   pid 57308, uptime 0:00:07
dog:0                            RUNNING   pid 57300, uptime 0:00:07
dog:1                            RUNNING   pid 57299, uptime 0:00:07
dog:2                            RUNNING   pid 57302, uptime 0:00:07
dog:3                            RUNNING   pid 57301, uptime 0:00:07
dog:4                            RUNNING   pid 57303, uptime 0:00:07
supervisor> help signal
signal <signal name> <name>	      Signal a process
signal <signal name> <gname>:*        Signal all processes in a group
signal <signal name> <name> <name>    Signal multiple processes or groups
supervisor> signal 1 dog:3 dog:4
dog:3: signalled
dog:4: signalled
supervisor> signal HUP dog:3 dog:4
dog:3: signalled
dog:4: signalled
supervisor> signal HUP dog:*
dog:1: signalled
dog:0: signalled
dog:3: signalled
dog:2: signalled
dog:4: signalled
supervisor> signal USR1 dog:1 dog:2
dog:1: signalled
dog:2: signalled

Also, if you can’t wait for supervisor to support this, the mr.laforge package supplies a supervisor plugin that can be used to send signals to processes:

$ supervisorctl kill HUP nginx

That said, it would be nice to have this built into supervisor…

Easier way to build _bsddb for OS X

I blogged previously about how to build _bsddb for Python 2.6 by hacking the Python source code to accommodate changes in berkeley-db.

Here’s an easier way that doesn’t require hacking source code.

Install berkeley-db using Homebrew:

brew install berkeley-db

Install the bsddb3 module, pointing it at an installation of berkeley-db:

sudo \
    BERKELEYDB_DIR=/usr/local/Cellar/berkeley-db/5.3.28 \
    pip-2.6 install bsddb3

Simply copy it into the appropriate place as _bsddb.so. This is super hacky and will fail if the interfaces of these two ever change, but for now for my limited purpose, it seems to work:

cp \
    /Library/Python/2.6/site-packages/bsddb3/_pybsddb.so \
    /Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.6/lib \
      /python2.6/lib-dynload/_bsddb.so

Enjoy:

$ python2.6
Python 2.6.7 (r267:88850, Oct 11 2012, 20:15:00)
[GCC 4.2.1 Compatible Apple Clang 4.0 (tags/Apple/clang-418.0.60)] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import bsddb
>>> dir(bsddb)
['MutableMapping', '_DBWithCursor', '_DeadlockWrap', '__builtins__', '__doc__', '__file__', '__name__', '__package__', '__path__', '__version__', '_bsddb', '_checkflag', '_db', '_iter_mixin', '_openDBEnv', 'absolute_import', 'btopen', 'collections', 'db', 'dbutils', 'error', 'hashopen', 'os', 'ref', 'rnopen', 'sys']

Building _bsddb for Python 2.6 on OS X 10.8.5

It’s well-known that the Python that comes with OS X machines typically doesn’t have _bsddb.

I downloaded Python 2.6.8 and attempted to build it and it wouldn’t build the _bsddb module.

Here’s what I did to fix this.

I used Homebrew to install berkeley-db4. For me, this grabbed version 4.8.30.

brew install berkeley-db4

Edited Modules/_bsddb.c and replaced all instances of DB_XIDDATASIZE with DB_GID_SIZE. I removed lines that had DB_XA_CREATE.

Compiled and linked with:

gcc -fno-strict-aliasing -fno-common -dynamic -g -O2 -DNDEBUG -g -fwrapv -O3 -Wall -Wstrict-prototypes -I/usr/local/Cellar/berkeley-db4/4.8.30/include/ -I/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.6/include/python2.6 -c /Users/marca/src/Python-2.6.8/Modules/_bsddb.c -o _bsddb.o
gcc -bundle -undefined dynamic_lookup _bsddb.o -L/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.6/lib -L/usr/local/lib -ldb -o _bsddb.so -Wl,-search_paths_first

This created the file Modules/_bsddb.so.

At this point, I can import if I run python in the Modules directory where I built _bsddb.so:

$ python2.6
Python 2.6.7 (r267:88850, Oct 11 2012, 20:15:00)
[GCC 4.2.1 Compatible Apple Clang 4.0 (tags/Apple/clang-418.0.60)] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import bsddb
>>> dir(bsddb)
['MutableMapping', '_DBWithCursor', '_DeadlockWrap', '__builtins__', '__doc__', '__file__', '__name__', '__package__', '__path__', '__version__', '_bsddb', '_checkflag', '_db', '_iter_mixin', '_openDBEnv', 'absolute_import', 'btopen', 'collections', 'db', 'dbutils', 'error', 'hashopen', 'os', 'ref', 'rnopen', 'sys']

Now you can copy _bsddb.so into your lib-dynload directory — e.g.:

sudo cp _bsddb.so /System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.6/lib/python2.6/lib-dynload

(above is for the system Python 2.6 that comes with OS X)

or

sudo cp _bsddb.so sudo cp /Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.6/lib/python2.6/lib-dynload

(above is for a Python 2.6 installed from a .dmg from Python.org or built from source as a framework build)

References: