Deer Park – that’s a good browser

I was wanting to mess around a bit with SVG today and so ended up downloading Mozilla Deer Park Alpha 2 for Mac OS X.

In case you don’t know, Deer Park is the code name for the trunk development of Firefox and is basically a preview of Firefox 1.5 (see the roadmap for more details). Among other things, it features performance enhancements, a redesigned Preferences dialog, SVG support, drag and drop reordering of tabs, and a new software update system. For the full scoop, check out the release notes.

I backed up my Firefox profile before installing of course.

I am impressed with it so far. The SVG support is nifty (although incomplete and buggy) but what I really liked was that it seems to take up about half as much memory as Firefox did on my PowerBook. Nice.

For those of you who did not grow up on the East Coast of the U.S., the title of this post is a play on the old Deer Park Spring Water ads (“Deer Park – that’s good water!”).

MyBlogLog

You may have noticed a new widget in my sidebar that shows my most popular external links, courtesy of MyBlogLog. Hopefully it’s kind of interesting and might help me to see what kind of stuff my readers are interested in.

Sync your Palm with Thunderbird address book

From treo Addicts:

For those of you who use Thunderbird, Firefox’s email companion, there is an extension available to sync your contacts with your Palm device. PalmSync winds up replacing the Palm address book Hotsync conduit. Unfortunately its only available for Windows users. You will want to have at least Thunderbird 1.0.2 installed (1.0.6 was recently released).

I have not tried this yet, but it looks pretty interesting. It’s a Windows-only conduit for syncing your Palm address book with the Thunderbird address book. Too bad I no longer have a Windows machine at work so I could only use this at home.

Think better with chewing gum?

Here’s an interesting article that claims that the simple act of chewing gum increases the mind’s ability to concentrate and to retain knowledge.

Research has shown that chewing does indeed increase our ability to concentrate and to retain what we’ve learned. In fact, studies indicate that, for both kids and adults, mental tasks are completed up to 20% more effectively when we chew gum.

Link